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The Battle Of the Diets: Keto Vs. Inuit

By Tom Seest

How Does A Keto Diet Compare To An Inuit Diet?

At BestKetoNews, we save you time and resources by curating relevant information and news about the keto / ketogenic diet.

The Ketogenic Diet is not just a fad diet. It is a lifestyle choice that has been endorsed by many doctors. And while it does have some similarities to the Inuit Diet, it is also very different. You will find out what the differences are and how you can benefit from a low-carb, high-fat diet.

How Does A Keto Diet Compare To An Inuit Diet?

How Does A Keto Diet Compare To An Inuit Diet?

Can The Inuit Diet Beat The Ketogenic Diet?

The Inuit diet is an example of a low carb diet. For centuries, people have eaten high fat, low carb diets. However, the ketogenic diet has become popular for its supposed health benefits.
While most of us know about the ketogenic diet, few of us are aware of the Inuit diet. The Eskimo people take in more carbohydrates than we are used to.
A typical Eskimo diet contains about 20% of their 3000 calories from carbohydrates. Typically, these carbohydrates are the form of glycogen, which is the starchy substance contained in raw meat.
Another low carb diet that is commonly referred to is the ketogenic diet. This diet is characterized by eating a large quantity of high fat, low carb foods. Some examples include salmon, fatty meat, and eggs. It also includes animal fibers.
The Inuit diet has been the subject of much scientific research. Vilhjalmur Stefansson, a Harvard-trained anthropologist, studied the diet and wrote extensively about it. He ate a lot of eggs and fish and derived about 15-20% of his dietary energy from protein.
Stefansson’s writing occurred at a time when scientists were discovering the wonders of nutrition. What he described was a way of life that evolved from a hunting and fishing culture.
In 1929, Stefansson and another colleague decided to recreate the Inuit diet under observation. They ate a combination of fatty meat and muscle meat. Their goal was to show how the Inuit were able to survive on this type of diet.

Can The Inuit Diet Beat The Ketogenic Diet?

Can The Inuit Diet Beat The Ketogenic Diet?

What Makes the Inuit Diet Stand Out?

The Ketogenic Diet and The Inuit Diet are two diets that have similarities and differences. The traditional Inuit diet has a lot of fat in it. It consists of about 50% fat and 15-20% carbohydrates.
In addition, the diet contains animal organs, especially raw seal blubber. This is rich in Vitamin C.
According to Harold Draper, the expert on Eskimo nutrition, Inuit obtain nutrients from fish oils. They practice exclusive breastfeeding until the child is two years old.
However, a high-fat diet can be unhealthy. For example, scurvy was a common condition among sailors for some time. Scurvy is caused by a lack of Vitamin C. During Stefansson’s study, he noted that the Inuit eat lots of fat, primarily behind their eyes.
Stefansson ate meat, salmon, and eggs. He also had a sirloin steak. These foods provided him with enough protein to sustain his ketogenic state.
At the same time, the Inuit eat a great deal of salt and potassium. This combination of nutrients is important in the harsh environment of the Arctic.
Despite the high percentage of fat in their diet, the Inuit maintained a high level of physical performance. Several bicyclist subjects reported a small decline in their endurance capacity during the first week of the diet. By the end of the second week, endurance was significantly increased over their baseline value.
The average subject lost 0.7 kilograms during the first week of the EKD. After two weeks of carbohydrate restriction, peak aerobic power was restored.

What Makes the Inuit Diet Stand Out?

What Makes the Inuit Diet Stand Out?

What Secrets Do Inuit Diets Hold?

Ketogenic diets have been shown to increase lifespan in several animal models. This may be due to their ability to slow down cognitive decline, decrease inflammation, and reduce the incidence of cancer. These benefits are based on the idea that the body switches to a fat-burning state when calorie restriction is applied.
In order to determine whether changes in dietary composition would improve longevity, researchers from the University of California, Davis, conducted a study. They studied two different groups of mice. The first group was fed a ketogenic diet.
The results showed that mice on this type of diet had longer life spans. They also showed that the ketogenic diet improved memory and motor function. Compared to the control group, the mice on the ketogenic diet had higher levels of protein acetylation, which is a marker of protein metabolism.
Researchers also found that the ketogenic diet increased muscle mass. Specifically, the mice on the diet had a greater mass of lean muscle tissue.
One of the researchers notes that a low-carbohydrate diet can be a great way to extend a mouse’s lifespan. However, some proponents of low-carb diets argue that rats aren’t given the proper diet.
There’s also been research into plant-based diets. Some studies have shown lower levels of inflammation, which is a primary cause of many health problems.
Ketogenic diets may be a good option for extending a person’s lifespan, but the science behind them is still very new. Fortunately, there’s plenty of research available to help us learn more.

What Secrets Do Inuit Diets Hold?

What Secrets Do Inuit Diets Hold?

What Impact Does Diet Have on Endurance Performance?

The ketogenic diet has been receiving much attention over the past three or so years. It has been praised for its ability to increase fat oxidation. Several studies have demonstrated the benefits of this type of diet in endurance performance. While the effects are varied and often contradictory, it is hard to deny the positive impact of a diet with substantial increases in fat oxidation.
The ketogenic diet, which is also known as the low carbohydrate, high fat (K-LCHF) diet, has been linked to a number of benefits, including increased rates of fat oxidation, improved energy expenditure, and enhanced recovery. However, the jury is still out on whether or not these benefits translate into a sustained increase in endurance capacity.
A recent study by Heatherley et al. examined the effects of a ketogenic diet on endurance time to exhaustion. Unlike prior studies, this trial used an unconventional protocol. Rather than a typical run to exhaustion, participants completed a progressively accelerating treadmill test, which measures VO2 max at varying speeds. Compared to the normal diet, this type of test was associated with a significant reduction in time to exhaustion.
The results of this study should be treated with caution, as it involved middle-aged recreational runners. However, this research does provide some novel insights into the underlying metabolic and physiological mechanisms underlying exercise metabolism. Specifically, it demonstrates how a ketogenic diet can significantly alter muscle substrate utilization and, thus, increase fat oxidation and oxygen consumption.

What Impact Does Diet Have on Endurance Performance?

What Impact Does Diet Have on Endurance Performance?

Which High-Fat Diet Reigns Supreme?

If you’re following a low-carb diet, you’re probably aware of the similarities between the Inuit diet and the ketogenic diet. Neither diet is completely without risks, though. The Inuit, for example, have a higher prevalence of a deleterious mutation in the CPT1A gene. This has a negative effect on infant health.
A study on the Inuit in Greenland suggests that Arctic peoples have evolved genetic adaptations to better survive in their harsh environment. However, the full implication of this gene mutation remains unknown.
While the Inuit do eat a high-fat diet, they’re not in ketosis. They rely on gluconeogenesis, a process where glucose is produced from protein. This process is vital for fetal growth, and low availability of glucose can lead to brain damage in Inuit babies.
Another similarity is the fact that the Inuit don’t produce as much omega-3 fatty acids as other populations. Researchers speculate that this is because the diet is so high in fat. Similarly, the Inuit don’t develop scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of Vitamin C.
In contrast to the low-carb, high-fat diets promoted by modern-day diet promoters, the Inuit ate a very specific diet. It included a variety of fatty marine animals such as whale blubber, seal, walrus, elk, and geese. Some of the foods were also very high in protein. Eventually, farming became more convenient and more nutritious than hunting, and the emphasis shifted to grains and vegetables.

Which High-Fat Diet Reigns Supreme?

Which High-Fat Diet Reigns Supreme?

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